Be Quick to Listen
March 11, 2016
Encouragement
March 18, 2016
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Workshop Highlights

Transmitting Emotion Workshop

In February, Love Loudly gave a workshop led by Mark Cripe, which worked through accepted cognitive behavior theories and how to use them in day-to-day life to lovingly empower others, encourage them, and dare them to be great. Concepts taught included Maslow’s Hierarchy of Human Needs, Franklin Reality Model, and the Johari Window, serving as insightful cornerstones in which to build positive and clear communication. What follows is a small summary of topics discussed.

Transmitting Emotion Workshop

In February, Love Loudly gave a workshop led by Mark Cripe, which worked through accepted cognitive behavior theories and how to use them in day-to-day life to lovingly empower others, encourage them, and dare them to be great. Concepts taught included Maslow’s Hierarchy of Human Needs, Franklin Reality Model, and the Johari Window, serving as insightful cornerstones in which to build positive and clear communication. What follows is a small summary of topics discussed.

Navigating "Behavior Problems"

Not all behavior problems are the result of pure defiance. Some cases, an individual who is acting arrogantly or refusing to do something might have a reason in doing so aside from rebelling for the sake of rebelling. In our workshop, Mark explored what motivates people to act, and referred to several psychology models and real life stories:

"[They told us] this kid has a behavior problem. We set down and find out this kid has a legitimate learning disability–he has dyslexia and nobody has diagnosed it. We had one boy who just couldn't see. Nobody had asked if he could see. He's sitting there, everything's blurry, what does the teacher do? The teacher puts him in the back of the classroom because he's not doing what he's supposed to be doing. He can't see, so he's back there just entertaining himself. Why does it take a law enforcement officer to take a child like that to an eye doctor and say "Hey can you do me a favor and just give this kid an eye test?" Kid gets his eye glasses, guess what happens to his grades? Guess what happens to his behaviors? Everything goes away."

So how do we find out if this behavior is from the lack of ability or desire? We have to be able to ask questions. Questions from a place of empathy, with the hope to understand, and not in a way that will put the individual in a state of fear. Just sit down and listen.

"If the behavior is dysfunctional because they lack ability, I can yell and scream, I can write them up, I can discipline them all day long and I do no good to anybody."
What if the Problem isn't Ability?

If the behavior is not an issue from a lack of ability, but from desire, how do we help? Sitting down and listening still applies. Instead of judging and dictating what should be done, ask questions. Understand what's happening. Get to the heart of the issue before enforcing anything.

"Get away from terms 'good' and 'bad' because of their ambiguity and judgmental tendencies, broadcasting rejection. Instead, label them functional and dysfunctional based on where they want to go and what their behavior currently is."

Applying a more logical approach and supporting the individual in finding their own solutions speaks more to encouragement than condemnation. In essence, love, not fear.

"I'm tired of having fear being so loud in my life."

At the heart of our workshop is the discussion of love and fear. Our actions and choices in life depend on these two powerful, four letter words. Our realities shift depending on which of those emotions we're operating from, with fear often being much louder than its counterpart. Are you, too, tired of living in fear?

"Think about a world, think about a workplace, think about a home, where there is no rejection—you risk no rejection. Think about what you would do or what you would become in that place. Think about if you raised your hand and you knew no one would make fun of you ever again, no matter what question you asked. What kind of question would you ask? That's the world I want to live in. That's the world I want to be apart of."

So how do we get there? By accepting, appreciating, and investing in those around us. By looking at someone with the desire and the intent to understand rather than condemn. Let's help each other live.

"I want you to invest in each other. I want you to invest in those you work with. I want you to invest in those you live with. You apply this stuff, it will begin to change lives, I guarantee that. The louder you can make your love, the more impactful your life will be in others'. It's just that simple."

Want to Attend a Workshop?

If you're interested in hearing more and attending a workshop yourself, please visit our Workshop page and fill out our form.

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